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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Guest post - Public survey on the new tax reform law

Survey Results from QuestionPro Audience
I have a guest post blog here from Javier Lopez, Marketing Director with QuestionPro Audience. He shares research from his company on how the public views the new tax reform act (Public Law 115-97). The results include that 45% understand the changes “a little.” That’s understandable as there are a lot of changes.  More from Javier …

H.R. 1 was signed on December 22, 2017 becoming Public Law 115-97, unofficially named the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. QuestionPro Audience conducted a nationwide survey of over 400 respondents from our registered voters panel to learn what Americans think about the recent tax reform.

The majority of respondents are in favor of the new tax code, even though only 32% believe they will receive a tax cut in 2018. 28% opposed the bill, and 31% were unsure how they felt about it. When asked how important of a priority tax reform should be, 75% of respondents felt it is very important, while 17% did not think it was important and 7% did not think it should not be done."


About QuestionPro Audience: With more than 12 years of industry experience, QuestionPro Audience specializes in developing and managing specialty research panels (or niche audiences), having 22 million panelists worldwide and more than 10 specialty panels that cover a wide range of audiences: Likely Voters, College Students, Consumer Electronics, Veterinarians, Healthcare, Builders, to name a few. 

What do you think?

2 comments:

Kelly H Myers said...

The survey is more favorable than I would have thought; 75% felt it was important legislation. It was not clear if the survey was of a "specialty group" or simply 400 random voters. The other intriguing find is the high rate - 45% - that understood the law!! I have not found one tax professional whom claims to understand the law; the entire law. I would agree that most tax professional understand 45% or more "of the law" but there are some major portions that will require a technical correction and/or leave too much for IRS/Treasury to decipher via Regulations, Notices, etc. For example, the evolution of IRC 163(j) and 199A will be fascinating to follow!! A great time to be in taxation.

mounika said...

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